Nautical Institute HE Alert Microsite

Nautical Institute HE Alert Microsite

Library

Here you can browse through our online database library, containing articles, papers and industry reference material.

  • HE00250 - The importance of the human element in shipping

    HE00250 - The importance of the human element in shipping

    By David Squire The Nautical Institute

    Developing technology has revolutionised the way in which ships and their systems are designed and operated, but there still remains the need for human involvement at some stage or other, no matter how much automation may be introduced.

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    Publish date: 23/09/2013

  • HE00245 - THE ROLE OF THE HUMAN ELEMENT IN NAVIGATION AND OTHER SHIP SYSTEMS

    HE00245 - THE ROLE OF THE HUMAN ELEMENT IN NAVIGATION AND OTHER SHIP SYSTEMS

    By David Squire, CBE, FNI

    I am going to talk primarily about the role of the human element in navigation but you will note from the title the add-on feature 'and other ship systems'.

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    Publish date: 23/09/2013

  • HE00240 - A Research Agenda in Maritime Crew Resource Management

    HE00240 - A Research Agenda in Maritime Crew Resource Management

    By Michael Barnett, PhD; David Gatfield, MSc; Claire Pekcan, MSc

    This paper opens with a brief introduction to the development of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in the international shipping industry, a concept that was first advanced through the use of simulators in maritime training colleges over 25 years ago.

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    Publish date: 23/09/2013

  • HE00215 - Some Thoughts on AIS

    HE00215 - Some Thoughts on AIS

    By Per Setterberg, 2nd Officer

    We are just getting our AIS transponder installed on the ship of which I am a second officer. What a waste of money! To me, this piece of equipment only symbolises how detached regulators are from reality.

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    Publish date: 23/09/2013

  • HE00210 - Some Thoughts on the Human Element in Shipping

    HE00210 - Some Thoughts on the Human Element in Shipping

    By Captain J. Arne Sandevärn, AFRIN, MemIMLA

    As we all know accidents at sea are caused on average 80% by the so called human factor and only 20 % by technical failures. Nevertheless most of the thinking and the money used for safety-at-sea matters seems to be spent on technical solutions.

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    Publish date: 23/09/2013